.

20 October 2009

Evel Me

It's that time of year again. Writing-bloggers are blogging about NaNoWriMo (here, for example), National Novel Writing Month, which I guess applies outside the US as well (I just checked -- yes, it does), in which you and a thousand other wanna-be novelists write 50,000 words from 1-30 November. That's 1666.66666... (etc) words a day for 30 days, or 2000 words a day from 1-26 November, at which point you could have a well-deserved Thanksgiving. Appealing? I'm not sure.

For some reason I can't figure out, I'm sorely tempted to try it. I think it's because it has a "quick-fix" feel -- like "30 days to better abs". It is completely unrealistic of me to think I could squeeze this in. So there's that, too -- the challenge effect. How hard can it be? Well, hard, I'm guessing. Have you ever tried to write 1666.6666 etc coherent words a day for 30 days in a row? More to the point would be how many days it would take for utter gibberish to take over.

On the other hand, it seems obvious that these days, one needs a stunt. It isn't enough to keep up the daily grind, word in and word out; oh no. It has to be special. There has to be pizzazz, a gimmick, a "wow" factor. It needs a crash helmet and Evel Knievel. I quite like being Jeannette, mild mannered meal maker and time-challenged dreanmer. But this Jeannette, in all honesty, is really dull. A person these days must be Super Jeannette, Evel Jeannette, word-wielding daredevilless who jumps over 2000 words a day for 30 days with her Intel-powered, Atom N280 processor with 1.66GHz Seashell... Whoosh! Can you feel it? Whoosh! Can you feel it? Can anybody out there feel it? Will somebody let me know?














Whoosh!






image credit.

2 comments:

  1. Has anyone every written a *good* novel in NaNoWriMo? It seems to me that a "writealong" is possibly not the best way to achieve art, unless you have a Mary Shelley moment and synthesize the zeitgeist into an instant classic (that sentence doesn't work but I don't have time to sort it out). I wonder how many mediocrities end up on the slushpile as a result of this entertainment for unfocused writers. Not that I'm not tempted to try too.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I meant "ever written", of course. Proof before you post.

    ReplyDelete