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01 June 2010

At last! Accessible Ashtanga yoga in Brussels


This is the kind of thing I almost don't want to tell anyone because I don't want this place to get crowded. But I don't want to keep the news all to myself, either, and Barbara, who created the space and teaches and does goodness knows what else, deserves to see her efforts flower.

Brussels is a funny place. While Ashtanga yoga has flourished across the US and in other European countries, it doesn't seem to be big in Belgium and certainly not in this city. The one place I found on the chaussée d'Alsemberg in Uccle was mysteriously closed whenever I used to walk past, and/or never answered the phone. (In all fairness it seems to be a bona fide Ashtanga studio. Maybe the management's changed.) Fortunately, when I first came to Brussels I was lucky enough to practice with Susannah, who lived in the Parvis St Gilles, at the top of a four-storey maison de maître: no one who ever practiced there will forget those stairs! Then I began going to classes with Susannah's colleague Elisabeth, who taught in French, and was, like Susannah, affiliated with Sampoorna yoga and its founder, Yogi Hari. Elisabeth taught a rigorous, very Ashtanga-like class (which I had started doing when I was pregnant with Helsinki - but that's another story), and I carried on practicing with her through my pregnancy with Clover, right up until Clover was born. I think I may have taken Clover to a couple classes afterward, too, when she was still small enough to sleep through it all in her maxi-cosi. But then I lost touch with that particular branch of the yoga world.

Fast-forward to lunch a few weeks ago. A new colleague of mine remarks that she is doing yoga, Ashtanga yoga; that a woman is giving Ashtanga classes up in the loft at the top of her house in Woluwe-St. Pierre. So I get her to send me the link. Incredible - but true! The website is welcoming and my god, there seem to be drop-in classes (another innovation Brussels can't seem to get its head around). I decide I have to got to take a closer look.

An introductory class is just starting up, with a 3-hour workshop to get things going on the weekend. Even though I'm not a debutante, I figure this is a good way to re-familiarize myself with the flow of postures, not to mention the fact that I might learn something new. Strike when the iron is hot, as they say...


Not me... from the Yoga Loft website

Well, I highly recommend it. I've done a lot of yoga, in a lot of different places, and what Barbara has created here is really special. Her story: originally from southern California, Barbara recently spent some time in San Francisco, where, she said, "there's a yoga studio on every corner." When she came back to Brussels she missed being part of a yoga community. So she decided to start one. She transformed the loft of her home into a beautiful space where people can come and breathe and stretch and feel good together.

The Yoga Loft opened in December 2009 and appears to be thriving. There is a full schedule of classes, options for private practice, and upcoming workshops and training, stages for kids (check out the website, www.theyogaloft.be). And, only three flights up this time!

5 comments:

  1. Yaaaaay!!! (You totally score good-karma-points for posting this.) I used to do ashtanga in Toronto, and like you was pretty disappointed with the lack of it here. I'll definitely be checking this out, thank you for posting the link!

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  2. A lot of people today are interested in Ashtanga Yoga poses. Basically, what ashtanga means in Sanskrit, is “eight limbs” (ashta stands for eight and anga for limb), which refers to the fact that the traditional yoga consist of 8 interconnected elements. Also, as modern times took their toll on many things, yoga wasn’t to be left aside in this storm of change.Aahtanga Yoga

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  3. A lot of people today are interested in Ashtanga Yoga poses. Basically, what ashtanga means in Sanskrit, is “eight limbs” (ashta stands for eight and anga for limb), which refers to the fact that the traditional yoga consist of 8 interconnected elements. Also, as modern times took their toll on many things, yoga wasn’t to be left aside in this storm of change.Aahtanga Yoga

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  4. Thank you Jeanette for posting this story online. Definitely a great studio and the place to be for personally guided ashtanga.

    I have been practising for more than 5 years and never saw my practice improve as fast as during Barbara's classes.

    Big recommendation to anyone.

    Namasté,


    George

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